ǂunn

show comment

lots of variation; for some speakers, ǂunn basically means 'fill', for others it basically means 'be full'. Accordingly, the verb can be used with or without the causative marker (ǀkxʼui CAUS in Eastern, kxʼuu 'do, make' in Western dialect), without change in meaning (see alternations below).

Coding frame

Examples

(89)
Na kxʼuu ǂʼunn ki.
na
1SG
kxʼuu
make
ǂʼunn
fill
ki
3NH.SG
‘I fill it (e.g. the pot).’
(90)
Ha ǂʼunn mandjiesi a ko.
ha
3SG
ǂʼunn
fill
mandjie-si
basket-SG
a
this
ko
other
‘He fills the other basket.’
(92)
Ha ǂʼunn emmersi.
ha
3SG
ǂʼunn
fill
emmer-si
bucket-SG
‘He fills the bucket.’
(97)
ǁhaike ke ǂʼunna ng sunn.
ǁhai-ke
milk-PL
ke
FOC
ǂʼunn-a
fill-STAT
ng
OBL
sunn
fat
‘The milk is full of fat. / The milk is full of cream, creamy, rich.’

Verb meaning , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# FILL Coding set Argument type
1 filler Ø A
2 filled container Ø P

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
N y
C
N y
C
N y
U
N n
U
N n
U
N n
U
N n
U
R n
(88)
‘The pot is full.’
(94)
‘It is full.’
(96)
‘His hands are full.’
(98)
‘The meat is full of fat.’
(99)
‘It is full.’
(100)
‘The cup is full now.’
(101)
‘The bag is full.’
(102)
‘Look, my bag is full!’
U
N n
U
N n
U
N n
U
N n
U
R n
(91)
‘The man fills the glass with water.’
(93)
‘He fills the bucket with berries.’
(95)
‘The man filled the glass with water.’
U
N n
U
N n
U
R n
U
R n
(87)
‘The man has filled the glass with water.’
(103)
‘The man fills the glass with water.’
C
N y
C
N y
U
N n
U
N n
C
N y