mete

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This is not a verb but an predicative adjective, and must be combined with the verbs 'to be' or 'to become'.
Both of its arguments take the absolutive. Reciprocals (know each other) are formed by using a dual/plural form of 'be', as appropriate, and placing the reflexive/reciprocal pronoun in the object slot.
'Know how to' is expressed also by
mete, with a single NP argument plus an infinitive complement taking the allative.
'Know that' is also expressed by
mete: the clause representing what is known simply follows, in finite form, with no complementizer or special marking.
'Not know' is expressed by the predicative adjective
mäpna, most likely derived from a form of mete (or its root) by adding privative -pna.

Coding frame

Complex Verb form
Verb type: COP A

Examples

(79)
Yna är bä mete ym yna toge.
yna
DEM
är
man
FUT
mete
know
y-m
3sgU:α-be:ND
yna
DEM
toge
child
‘The man knows that boy.’
(81)
Ynd bi {rts/ogyabs} mete wm.
ynd
1sgABS
bi
sago(ABS)
{rt-s/ogyab-s}
{beat-NLZR/work-NLZR}
mete
know
w-m
1sgU:α-be:ND
‘I know how to beat/work sago.’
(82)
Ynd mete te nämtendn, bä bä ynm.
ynd
1sgABS
mete
know
te
already
n-ämte-nd-n
M:α-become-ND:PST.PF-1sgA
3ABS
FUT
y-n-m
3sgU:α-TOW-be
‘I knew he would come.’

Verb meaning , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# KNOW Coding set Argument type
1 knower NP-abs & und.V S
2 known thing/person NP-abs X

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
R y
(80)
‘Those two men know each other.’
C
y
C
y
U
n
U
n
C
y
C
y
C
y
U
n
U
n
C
y
C
y
C
y
C
y
C
y
U
n
U
n