kkada (까다)

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Similarly to DIG, the accusative object can either be the thing peeled off something else, or the object off which something is taken away.

Interestingly, both the thing peeled and the object peeled off can occur in the same sentence and be marked with accusative case. This (ex. 169) has been chosen as an example for possessor ascension, since the peeled object can occur NP-internally as the modifier of the object peeled off (ex. 285).

If such a verb with two overtly accusative-marked NPs is passivised, then both NPs can receive nominative marking, that is, the possessor ascension also works for passivised verbs (see ex. 287).

Coding frame

Simplex Verb form

Examples

(146)
Nunaga gyureul kkatta.
nuna-ga
older_sister_of_male-NOM
gyul-eul
tangerine-ACC
kka-ss-da
peel-PST-DECL
‘Mother peeled a tangerine.’
(285)
Meonjeo sagwa kkeopjjireul kkaya handa.
meonjeo
first
sagwa
apple
kkeopjil-eul
skin-ACC
kka-ya
peel-MOD
ha-n-da
do-NPST-DECL
‘First, you have to peel the skin off the apple.’

Verb meaning , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# PEEL Coding set Argument type
1 peeler NP-nom A
2 peeled object NP-acc P

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
R y
(305)
‘Mum, can you peel this tangerine for me? I just don't have the energy to do that right now.’
C
N y
C
R y
U
N n
C
R y
(284)
‘I grazed my knee yesterday when I fell over.’
U
R n
(169)
‘First, one peels the skin off the apple.’
U
N n
C
R y
(286)
‘I grazed my knee yesterday when I fell over.’
(287)
‘Mum, this pumpkin skin just doesn't want to come off!’
C
N y
U
N n