dallida (달리다 )

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This verb occasionally occurs with accusative-marked arguments (I chose this term for lack of further research, it is actually not sure what the syntactic status of these accusative-marked constituents is), which generally only can be a way argument (ex. 263), including the length value of a way (ex. 252).

As far as my intuition is concerned, such accusative-marked constituents may not become nominative marked ones in periphrastic passive constructions, which puts the object status of the way-constituents into question.

Still, curiously, it seems to be possible to build periphrastic 'passive' constructions here although this verb is intransitive. As a result, an impersonal construction is created where there seems to be no agent expressible. Since I am not sure about the acceptability/frequence of such a form, I have checked the value 'marginally' here.

Coding frame

Simplex Verb form

Examples

(36)
Mari dallyeotta.
mal-i
horse-NOM
dalli-eoss-da
run-PST-DECL
‘The horse ran.’
(262)
Naega oneul chong sip kiromiteoreul dallyeotta.
nae-ga
1SG-NOM
oneul
today
chong
total
sib
ten
kiromiteo-reul
kilometre-ACC
dalli-eoss-da
run-PST-DECL
‘In total I ran 10 kilometres today.’
(263)
Oneul naega jeon koseureul dallyeogajigo eomcheong pigonhada.
oneul
today
nae-ga
1SG-NOM
jeon
whole
koseu-reul
course-ACC
dalli-eogajigo
run-because
eomcheong
really
pigonha-da
tiredness:do-DECL
‘I've run the whole course today and am really, really tired.’

Verb meaning , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# RUN Coding set Argument type
1 runner NP-nom S

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
N y
C
R y
C
N y
U
N n
C
N y
U
N n
U
N n
C
M y
(264)
‘If one works on one's stamina continuously, one can run much more easily.’
C
N y
U
N n