chada (차다)

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In its intransitive form, this verb means something similar to 'get full' or 'be full', depending on for which tense, aspect or mood features this verb is inflected for.

Two things can be said about the coding frame here. Firstly, I have chosen the NOM-LOC pattern, a pattern that can be found with several other verbs such as
salda 'LIVE'. This pattern has been chosen merely according to the case marking of the arguments and not according to the order of constituents, although ex. 231 has been created to show that in an unmarked context it seems odd to have the nominative-marked NP which precedes the locative NP. Even if one said that scrambling is possible to a large degree in Korean (cf. Sohn 1999: 15; a statement that I do not necessarily agree with given its questionable informative value and explanatory depth), I do not know whether in some contexts it would be alright to have the nominative NP (with represents the filling material) precede the locative NP (which represents the container). So possibly, one might have to consider the possibility that NOM-LOC V might be a coding frame that is different from LOC-NOM V, although it is probable that there will be other speakers of Korean who agree with both ordering variants.

Secondly, this verb shows a locative case frame alternation where the LOC-NOM pattern (ex. 175) alternates with NOM-INSTR (in this order, see ex. 270), where the container NP occurs in nominative and the filling material NP in instrumental case. Several researchers (e.g., Yeon 2003: 196) have mentioned that such a case alternation brings about a holistic/partial-affectedness interpretation, although this is questionable.

The actual equivalent FILL asked for in this database is a causative form of
chada, chae-u-da, get_full-CAUS-DECL, 'fill something'. The causative form of chada then shows the same coding pattern alternation as for deopda 'COVER
'. Note that the
-u- suffixation results in the fronting of the <a> to <ae>, and this type of vowel change does not seem to happen regularly which could be an indication for a higher degree of lexicalisation of the causative verb.

A benefactive form can be derived from
chae-u-da with its NOM-ACC-INSTR pattern, which results in a NOM-DAT-ACC case pattern where the DAT marked NP is that representing the beneficiary and ACC that of the container. As to whether deriving a benefactive coding pattern from a NOM-LOC-ACC coding pattern with a resulting accusative-marked container NP is also acceptable, further research is needed. Still, this observation is interesting since for the benefactive form of deopda 'COVER' the NOM-LOC-ACC has been given as the preferred coding frame to derive the benefactive pattern from. Maybe these differences are rather due to my idiolectal habits and should be further tested.

Coding frame

Simplex Verb form

Examples

(175)
Pyee muri chatta.
pye-e
lung-LOC
mul-i
water-NOM
cha-ss-da
get_full-PST-DECL
‘The lungs are/were filled with water.’
(4)
Hyeongi naege janeul chaewo jwotta.
hyeong-i
older_brother-NOM
na-ege
I-DAT
jan-eul
glass-ACC
chae-u-eo
get_full-CAUS-CONV
ju-eoss-da
give-PST-DECL
‘My older brother filled a glass for me.’
(231)
?Muri pyee chatta.
mul-i
water-NOM
pye-e
lungs-LOC
cha-ss-da
get_full-PST-DECL
‘The lungs got full with water.’

Verb meaning , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# FILL Coding set Argument type
1 filler NP-nom S
2 filled container NP-loc L

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
R y
(3)
‘My older brother filled the water into his glass.’
(232)
‘She filled water into the glass.’
C
R y
U
N n
C
N y
U
N n
U
N n
C
N y
C
N y
U
R n
(227)
‘The lungs were filled with water.’
C
N y