deullida (2) (들리다)

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This verb is a causative form of LISTEN, and homonymous with its passive form (cf.Yeon 2003:Ch.6 on causative-passive relationships). The range of meanings of this verb varies from 'play somebody some music' via 'show somebody some music' up to 'tell somebody a story', and thus seem to denote something which means generally 'SHOW something through the auditive channel'. It is questionable whether boyeojuda 'SHOW (visually)' can be used for auditive information as well.

Although the author could find written examples of this verb in its base form (it almost seems like prescipritve hypercorrection to me, cf.ex. 206), it is generally not used in spoken language. What is used, much like
boida 'SHOW (visually)', is the benefactive form of this verb, thus deud-li-eo ju-da, listen-CAUS-CONV give-DECL, 'SHOW (auditively)' (cf. 108, 207). As to the valency of this verb, the coding pattern of the (in spoken language probably dated) causative of LISTEN is NOM-DAT-ACC already, which is probably why the benefactive alternation does not add an additional (dative-marked) argument to the verb's valency, but rather the causee seems to be the beneficiary at the same time (which, on the intuitive level, makes sense here).

Not that the benefactive
deullyeojuda can have a double accusative case frame as well, just as boyeojuda 'SHOW(visually)'.

Coding frame

Complex Verb form

Example

(206)
Naega aideurege jaeminneun iyagireul deullyeotteoni neomu joahanda.
na-ga
1SG-NOM
ai-deul-ege
child-PL-DAT
jaemiss-neun
fun:have-ATTR
iyagi-reul
story-ACC
deud-li-eoss-deoni
listen-PASS-PST-CONV
neomu
too_much
joh-a
like-CONV
ha-n-da
do-NPST-DECL
‘As I told the children my story, they really liked it.’

Verb meanings , Microroles , Coding sets and Argument types

# SHOW TELL Coding set Argument type
1 shower NP-nom A
2 shown thing NP-acc P
3 showing addressee NP-dat X

Alternations

Alternation name Occurs Examples
C
N y
C
R y
C
N no change in valency, because it is already a ditransitive verb y
(108)
‘The older sister showed her brother some music.’
U
N n
C
N y
U
N n
U
R The benefactive form can appear with two ACC-marked arguments. n
(207)
‘My sister showed me some music.’
C
N y
C
N y
U
N n